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Suitability Of Placental Blood Sample Of Infant For Pre-Transfusion Testing

There is limited research on the suitability of placenta blood samples from newborns for pre-transfusion testing. Some preliminary studies suggest that placental blood may be a good source of fresh red cell units. Only if the blood is collected in a safe tube bought from a verified Disposable Blood Collection Tube Exporter. Moreover, platelets for transfusion are not known whether this holds in all cases or if there are any specific risks associated with using placental blood for pre-transfusion testing. Until more information is available, we recommend that donators are not given a transfusion using placental blood for pre-transfusion testing.

Hemoglobin Modeling:

Having newborns have their hemoglobin levels checked to give parents both assurance about the red cell values and the knowledge of what the child’s actual hemoglobin range should be. Parents often prefer knowing beforehand versus receiving potentially inaccurate lab results, especially if they notice that there seems to be a wide “range” of reported values.

Red Cell Alloimmunization:

One may choose to have newborn screening done if they are at increased risk or if a sibling has leukemia. Blood transfusions intended for the child being screened often contain both autologous and allogenic donations to reduce any Hemolytic disease of travellers due to donors’ red cells. However, the risk of alloimmunization to the child can still occur. Some donors have Hemolysis who do not show any red cell agammaglobulinemia. On rarer occasions, there are false-negative results. This means that it appears as if a member of a sibling’s family has no cells destroyed when in fact, they do. If you feel at risk, we recommend waiting until after birth to have the newborn screened. And that you wait until one year of age before having a donor/family member chosen for screening.

Red Cell Storage:

It is best if someone with undefined Rh- blood uses their blood. Whenever possible not to increase their risk should the baby inherit an Rh-positive trait from their parents’ cells. If family members have previously been tested and are Rh-positive, a second-tier screening test is performed after the newborn’s red blood cell count has increased. This usually involves testing for Factor Thetat (FT) protein and an extra panel of antibodies not used in standard screens.

Red Cell Storage:

For those with Rh+ or unknown/clear ancestry, there are several options open to them concerning how they would like their cells stored once they’ve decided to donate them. The “borrower” can choose from several types of storage. This vary in their level of viability and effectiveness with regards to donor potential as well as cost:

Upon the screen, the mother’s red blood cells are sent down for donation via a living donor coordinator. Option 1 requires that she carry both an Rh-positive +ve proteinuria screening test DAT. Whether for Rh- or for protein histochemistry, and a screening test to determine antigen sensitivity () DAS. Option 2 requires both androgenetic antibodies EMA, FGA/FAB and MNS; IgM anti- kappa globulin GM – RPA.

Screening is the most thorough but can be delayed by several months compared to your blood. These banks keep their clients’ red blood cells indefinitely until needed based upon the donor’s age and other factors. Unlike US or Canadian “standard donors”, privately banked units may be given in addition to professionally transfused units. However, it is required that there are multiple agencies on file for each recipient and authorization from either a healthcare professional or the donor to use a private banked unit. As there is no central repository of information regarding stored units. Therefore a donation can only be confirmed by contacting one’s appropriate recipient agency direct -and they should send back an authorization form with your name and contact information.

Commonly Used Blood Tests for Older Adults:

Option 1: 

Breast milk antibodies DAB and anti-D immunoglobulin G (IgG). Screening is required if the donor is younger than 60 years of age. Donors’ red blood cells are used immediately or stored in a private bank for later use.

Option 2:

Androgenetic antibodies EMA, FGA/FAB and MNS. Screening is not required, but the donor must be at least 18 years of age and good health. Donors’ red blood cells are used immediately or stored in a private bank for later use.

Option 3:

Proteinuria screening test DAT and antigen sensitivity screening test DAS. Screening is required if the donor is younger than 60 years of age. If the donor meets these criteria, their red blood cells are used or stored in a private bank for later use.

Option 4:

Cholesterol screening test LDL, HDL and VLDL. Screening is not required, but the donor must be asymptomatic. Moreover, have an apolipoprotein B level of less than 100 mg/dL. Donors’ red blood cells are used immediately or stored in a private bank for later use.

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